Bad Math

A belief is a thought you keep thinking. A disbelief is a thought you keep thinking that is contrary to another thought. Limiting beliefs are somewhere in between. You think something is possible, you simply believe it is difficult or requires something specific in order to occur.

Here and now, each of us has desires we are not up to speed with. This is natural. Maybe we believe the desire is possible, just not yet probable. Maybe we believe that in order for this desire to be fulfilled, a whole host of other things need to happen first. Maybe we so disbelieve in the probability of the desire fulfilled, we think only a miracle could make it happen.

In any case, when we have a desire, something akin to a golden cord is created. This invisible yet vibrant cord connects us to this desire. It pulls us toward it. The more we want what we desire, the stronger the pull.

In that moment we first think about a desire, we, in almost all cases, also have a disbelief or limiting belief about what it would take to attain that desire. Desires are most often born out of the experience of not having or having the opposite of what we want.

For example, each of us lives somewhere. Many of us can probably describe a better place to you. Maybe it is in the same city, but a nicer place: a bigger place, a newer place, a more luxurious place, a place closer in or further out, a place with a nicer view, nicer kitchen, a garage. Maybe the nicer place is our very own home, but improved or expanded in some way.

In those early moments of identifying a desire, we are usually quite clear about the distance between here and there. Maybe that distance is measured in time, maybe in dollars. “I would love to have that…someday…but I just don’t have the money/time/resources/know-how right now.”

A desire creates an invisible golden cord, which pulls us toward it. A disbelief creates an often visible obstacle. When the desire is strong, the pull is strong. When the disbelief is strong (when it is thought about often), the obstacle seems to become insurmountable. Given enough time, the cord pulls us right up to and against the obstacle. The obstacle thus becomes real and not just imagined. [This is simple manifestation, even if it is the creation of something unwanted.]

There is a metaphysical school of thought, which states that you “have to believe”. You have to be able to visualize what you desire. You have to focus on your desires. You have to say affirmations repeatedly until you get there.

I think there is an easier way.

The desire exists whether you think about it or not. Yes, the more you think about what you desire, the stronger the pull, but it exists regardless. The pull exists regardless.

Since a belief is only a thought you keep thinking, and a limiting belief or disbelief is the same thing, one needn’t try to change disbelief into belief in order to have what he or she wants, one merely needs to stop thinking about it (the disbelief) so much.

In other words, I may think that I have to do x, y, and z in order to experience a, b, and c. In other words, I don’t believe a, b, and c will happen on their own. I believe they require x, y, and z. This is a limiting belief. This is what I call Bad Math.

However, if I stop thinking about a, b, and c for a while, I’ll also stop thinking about the errant, limited belief about the requirements to get there. The less I think the thoughts that constitute the limited belief, the less I will create obstacles. These believed in limitations may very well exist out there in the world, they simply will not be as prevalent in my day-to-day journeying. I won’t keep running into them.

Even when I am not thinking about my desire, it is pulling me along. The simple reason this is true is because my inner being is thinking about my desires, even when I am not.

So, my desires, when not thought about much, still pull me along, but subtly. Since I am not actively disbelieving (by staying off the subject), I am not actively creating obstacles, and thus my journeying is smooth.

Evidence of journeying does become more evident. It is natural. When you are moving, even if you don’t notice your movement, you will eventually notice how far you have traveled. You will notice being in a different place than you were before. And when you notice movement toward your desires, even if you haven’t been trying to move in that direction, your belief in the possibility (and probability) will naturally increase. You will notice that you are closer and you will thus believe in the fulfillment of your desire more and doubt less.

So, if you find yourself feeling like something is impossible or improbable, if your doubts are strong, if you are surrounded by bad math (no matter whether you came up with it yourself or whether someone else convinced you of it), all you need do is think about other things for a while. Think about things that don’t matter as much. Think about things you believe in more. Think about things that have nothing to do with you or what you so deeply desire.

By removing your focus from your disbeliefs (or limiting beliefs), you allow obstacles to erode. Soon, you’ll forget about these obstacles and then notice you got past one of them without even trying. You’ll find yourself in an experience that, in the past, you doubted. You’ll find yourself closer to things you desire without actively having pursued them. You’ll find yourself saying, “Well that wasn’t so bad.” or “I didn’t think I’d get here.”

If you can, catch yourself when you’re doing bad math.

Bad math is when we apply cause and effect well beyond what is actually true. Any time you have a desire, and you tell yourself it can’t happen because of some reason, you are performing some form of bad math.

  • I can’t have <this experience> because I don’t have <this other thing>.
  • I can’t have <this> because I have too much of <that>.
  • I can’t have <this> unless I miraculously attain <that>.

Bad Math. It is not good for you.

Don’t try and disprove your bad math. Just stop paying attention to it. Stop talking about it. Stop trying to figure out a way around it. Just catch yourself doing bad math, and go do something else.

Bad math also happens post manifestationally. We have a bad experience, and come up with all sorts of reasons why it happened. We feel we got what we deserved (the bad thing) and are thus not worthy of what we want. We think we’re not good enough. Good enough is always bad math because good enough has nothing to do with anything. Anyone can have anything they focus on and being good is not the reason they’ll get it or not.

The more you ease away from bad math, the more you’ll receive what seems unwarranted (by others). “Boy are you lucky,” they’ll say. “I’d rather be lucky than good,” they’ll say.

Desire trumps belief. You don’t have to believe that you’ll get what you desire, just don’t kill it with doubt. The Universe is comprised of infinite intelligence. It not only knows how your desires will manifest, it is ready willing and able to show you the way!

It really is that easy!

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2 thoughts on “Bad Math

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